CONIFER SOLAR CONSULTING

Jon Klima, Owner
360 Trout Lane, PO Box 23, Guffey, CO 80820
Phone: 719 479-2281,  Email: jon.klima@gmail.com
In business for 37 years

 

• Article 26 - July/August, 1998

 

Independent Energy C-100 Programming©

 

In the May 1996 issue of the CoSEIA newsletter, I reviewed the programming capabilities of the Independent Energy C-100-P2 controller. Since I get one or two calls each month dealing with C-100 programming, I've decided to go over the C-100-P2 programming once again, but this time I'll present the information in a somewhat different format. Hopefully, this will be in a form that will be of more value to you. Page numbers refer to the C100/120Programming, Installation, and Application Manual where the programming details and subtle points can be found.

 

OUTPUT #1 ON / OFF DIFFERENTIALS (Pgs 6-8)
20/5, A3=ON, A4=ON
8/3, A3=OFF, A4=ON
16/5 Proportional, A3=ON, A4=OFF
8/4 Proportional, A3=OFF, A4=OFF

 

OUTPUT #2 ON/OFF DIFFERENTIALS (Pgs 11-14)
20/5, B7=ON, B8=ON
8/3, B7=OFF, B8=ON
16/5 Proportional, B7=ON, B8=OFF
8/4 Proportional, B7=OFF, B8=OFF

 

AUX 1 REFERENCED TO AUX 2 (FOR OUTPUT #2) (Pg 11)
Al=OFF, A2=OFF

 

AUX 1 REFERENCED TO STO (FOR OUTPUT #2) (Pg 11)
Al=ON, A2=ON

 

NO FREEZE PROTECTION (Pg 34)
A5=ON, B1=ON, B2=ON

 

OUTPUT #1 RECIRCULATION FREEZE PROTECTION (Pg 11)
A5=ON, B1=OFF, B2=ON

 

OUTPUT #3 DRAINDOWN (OFF) ON FREEZE OR HIGHLIMIT (Pg 17)
A5=ON, B1=ON, B2=OFF

 

OUTPUT #3 DRAINDOWN (OFF) ON FREEZE (Pg 17)
A5=ON, B1=OFF, B2=OFF

 

OUTPUT #2 DRAINDOWN (OFF) ON FREEZE OR HIGHLIMIT (Pg 16)
A5=OFF, B1=ON, B2=OFF

 

OUTPUT #2 DRAINDOWN (OFF) ON FREEZE (Pg 16)
A5=OFF, B1=OFF, B2=OFF

 

TEMPERATURE UNITS DISPLAYED (Pg 21)
A6=OFF displays F
A6=ON displays C

 

BACK-UP ELEMENT INTERLOCK (Pg 18)
A8=OFF enables OUTPUT #3 to energize an interlock contactor
A8=ON disables this function

 

OUTPUT #2 HIGH LIMIT (Pg 14)*
B3=OFF turns OUTPUT #2 OFF at AUX #3 high limit setting
B3=ON disables OUTPUT #2 high limit

 

OUTPUT #1 HIGH LIMIT (Pg 8)
B4=OFF turns OUTPUT #1 OFF at AUX #4 high limit setting
B4=ON disables OUTPUT #1 high limit

 

NOCTURNAL COOLING (OUTPUT #1) (Pg 9)
B5=OFF enables nocturnal cooling
B5=ON disables nocturnal cooling

 

WOODSTOVE OVER TEMPERATURE PROTECTION (Pg 15)
B6=OFF prevents OUTPUT #2 from turning ON if AUX 1 sensor exceeds 210° F
B6=ON disables this function

 

Switch A7 is used with C-120 controllers and deals with direct and indirect heating (see Pg 19-20 of the C100/C120 Programming manual).

 

* If AUX 1 is referenced to STO, OUTPUT #2 high limit is set by the AUX 4 high limit resistor (if enabled, B4=OFF). If AUX 1 is referenced to AUX 2, OUTPUT #2 high limit is set by the AUX 3 high limit resistor (if enabled, B3=OFF) (Pg 14).

 

Other switch setting combinations are certainly possible, but they are not documented by Independent Energy and I do not know what outputs will result.

 

On another note, I had a discussion with Randy Gee at Industrial Solar Technology concerning my article dealing with the expansion tanks in the previous newsletter. Randy felt the" psig" notation I used throughout the article should have been "psia" (pounds per square inch absolute). I used psig in the article because that is what the tire gauges and pressure gauges used on the solar thermal systems read. However, Randy is certainly correct when it comes to the analyses that were made, i.e., the equations used should use pressure values in psia. (FYI, psia = psig + atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric pressure at sea level is 14.7 psi and 12 psi at 5000 feet elevation.) This changes some of the calculated results. Charging a system to 30 psig (30 + 12 = 42 psia) with an expansion tank precharged to 15 psig (15 + 12 = 27 psia) will move the bladder only about 36% of the way into the expansion tank rather than midway as the article stated. The system would need to be charged to 42 psig (2 x 27 psia = 54 psia =42 psig) to move the bladder to the mid-tank position. Additionally, I stated boiling of a 50/50 mixture of propylene glycol water mixture would occur in stagnated panels (325° F) at "pressures below 80 psig." This should have been at "pressures below 80 psia." So at a 5000-footelevation, boiling will be at about 68 psig. The rest of the article conclusions should be ok. I hope these discrepancies didn't cause anybody any problems.

 

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